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Title: Rain
Author/Artist: Hinata Plusle
Prompt: Sweden/Any nation - lost in the woods or other geographical location - 1900s or modern
Other characters: Norway, Denmark, Finland, Iceland
Rating: K+
Content notes: Human names. Norway - Aksel; Denmark - Thorbjørn; Finland - Timo.
Mentions of past one-sided Sufin.
Summary: Pretending is hard. The weather doesn't help.



Sweden had disappeared.

Nobody was quite sure what had happened. He had gone camping and just vanished, leaving no traces whatsoever. It had been Sealand who had found out he was not where he was supposed to be, when he’d gone to pay a surprise visit and found an empty, somewhat dusty house, with no parked car.

The Nordics, who had been promptly notified, gathered at his house in an attempt to reach an agreement on what to do. Denmark cut short the awkward silence that had been dragging on:

"Should we look for him?"

"Denmark, that’s pretty obvious. He’s not going to die from starvation, but I don’t realy think we should leave him to his own devices."

"Yes, I know, but…"

The conversation was interrupted by Iceland:

"Question is, Norway, does he even want to be found?"

"Are you implying he ran away?"

"He wouldn’t be the first."

Finland, who had not said a thing until then, assumed it was necessary to try and cool down everyone’s nerves first:

"Let’s just calm down, shall we? Wherever he is, we know he must be doing decently. There must be some tea and coffee in his cupboard… Let’s discuss later."

The other three stared at him for a few seconds, then reluctantly nodded, one by one.

--

"Where are Faroe, Åland and Greenland?"

"Åland wouldn’t answer the phone."

"Same for Faroe. Greenland refused to come."

Iceland rolled his eyes.

"So we’re stuck. Only four of us."

His brother sipped his coffee.

"What about Sealand and Ladonia?"

Finland sighed.

"Couldn’t contact Ladonia. I thought it’d be too much for Sealand, so I left him at England’s, much to his own distaste."

An awkward silence followed, cut short by Norway.

"So, are we looking for him tomorrow?"

Finland nodded.

"I believe it’s wise to do so. I don’t really think he ran away. Why would he tell us he was going camping if he had no intention of being found?"

Denmark frowned.

"Are you implying he got lost in his own country?"

"Not exactly. He could be stuck somewhere or something."

"It just doesn’t make sense, Finland. It’s not winter for him to be stuck because of the snow."

Norway sighed.

"There are many other ways to get stuck somewhere, you idiot. Besides, would you rather believe that… Or that he actually vanished?"

"Ever so subtle, brother."

They ended up not going to look for him for over a week, debating whether it was reasonable to do something so invasive.

What made them get the ball rolling was an unexpected storm that hit the entirety of Sweden.

--

For the first few days, only the four of them searched, with no success.

Later, they deemed reasonable to call for external help, and soon his human name was in the list of disappeared citizens.

No other storm hit the country, but it was suspiciously rainy and cloudy. Something just was not right.

--

He was found.

Unconscious, appallingly thin, with a broken leg, and what looked like a nasty injury in an arm.

They knew very well he’d survive. He’d endured way worse things before, after all.

What made them worry the most was how long it took him to wake up.

--

He had no recollection of what had happened while he was lost.

In fact, he had no recollection of anything.

At all.

He had to be reminded of his name, of basic words in his own language, and many other things.

It was too much for Iceland and he went back to his own home as soon as he found out.

Sealand did not like the idea of having to stay too long with England, but did not protest when Finland phoned him to give the bad news.

Ladonia was still nowhere to be found.

Which only left three people to take care of a greatly debilitated man who had no memories at all.

That'd be a though situation in any case. His, however, was much worse.

Was he going to believe he was hundreds and hundreds of years old? That he had seen his own country's history with his very own eyes, even if he had no recollection of them? That there were others, just like him, spread around the world, including those three who seemingly meant a lot to him?

Was it even worth telling him about all that?

Norway thought it was unfair not to let him decide. Denmark and Finland thought it was just better that he was kept in blissful ignorance.

Norway doubted such ignorance would ever be blissful, but did not comment on it. Thus, it was wordlessly agreed that they'd just act as if he was a common citizen.

--

There was no way it would work.

Even with nothing obvious to remind him of his status, he was still as smart as before and soon realized there were a few things... Off.

Just like that. Off.

How they'd never approve any relationship he had, with an unknown reason behind it. How they'd talk about distant pasts as something much closer than any common youngsters would deem. How they had attics full of stuff that should be in a museum rather than at some dusty corner of a house.

How his mood would seemingly affect weather.

He did not comment on it, but never fooled the three. He was also aware of that.

Perhaps it was a matter of time until he found out whatever ugly truth they had been hiding.

--

"How old are you, Aksel?"

"I'm 27, why the question?"

"No, how old are you actually?"

"What are you talking about? Don't be nonsensical."

"You were 28 five years ago."

An awkward silence followed.

"I am not aging either."

"High time you realised."

"Ever so subtle. What are we?"

"It's better if you don't know."

"Knowledge might be troublesome, but it is not with ignorance that issues will be solved."

"I can't possibly ignore what I agreed with Timo and Thorbjørn."

"Am I immortal?"

Another long silence.

"Not quite. You have abnormal endurance and healing rates, but you probably won't survive being shot in the head or stabbed in your chest. And you do age. Only extremely slowly."

"How many of us are there?"

"More than you can imagine."

"Why don't you three introduce me to others?"

"I don't really think it'd be helpful. We have some very old issues and rivalries."

"When did I give you permission to decide my fate?"

A sigh.

"You really never change, Sverige."

"What did you just call me?"

"Sverige."

"I am Swedish, but not Sweden itself."

"You are. You just don't remember."

A cup falls from a table.

--

"How did I use to be?"

"Not very different. Perhaps a bit more stoic. You know, you're still yourself."

"I am not asking for such answers."

A sip on a beer.

"Fine, fine. You were a lot scary and could intimidate a lot of people only by looking at them. I didn't get on well with you for centuries, as you probably must imagine from your history books. But recently we had become decent friends. You were madly in love with Timo, or Finland, for centuries too, as he seemed to be the only topic you knew when you got drunk, but never got around to talk to him about that, even though the only thing you seemed to care about besides your citizens was your weird family-like unit that consisted of you two, Sealand and Ladonia."

"Who are Sealand and Ladonia?"

"Two sons you had, one of them adopted. Micronations. Never got recognized but still had personifications."

"Why did you keep me from talking to them?"

"We hadn't heard of Ladonia for years prior to the disappearance that ultimately led to your memory loss. As for Sealand... Finland sent him back to England so he wouldn't be involved in the mess, but the lack of recognition was too hard for him to deal."

--

"Why did you never tell me I had two sons?"

"We had decided to make you just erase your previous life. Didn't think it would be so messy. Thought the less nations involved, the better."

"And forced me to leave my beloved family behind?"

"We were never quite a family. And don't be hypocritical. You don't feel a thing for those you left."

"But it hurts to know I once felt and never had the chance to feel again."

"So you think it was easy to make that decision? Pretending all of us had no extraordinary history was never easy."

A fist clenches.

"Easy or hard, still not right."

"You know what? You're right. And it was not only your sons. We made you leave dozens of centuries old friends, whom you had known since God only knows when. However, would you really want them to have to look at an apathetic you and know only they remembered so many things? It's just impossible to tell my history without mentioning you and it hurts more than you can imagine that only I remember each detail. And I'm not the only one. We just can't look at you with the same eyes."

--

It rained for weeks on no end.

He was never seen again.
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